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Time Management Education is Essential. 

Structure, repetition, consistency, and clarity are proven ingredients to helping students build strong executive functioning skills. 

Armstrong, Thomas. The Power of the Adolescent Brain: Strategies for Teaching Middle and High School Students. ASCD, 2016. 

 

“In this thought-provoking book, Thomas Armstrong looks at the power and promise of the teenage brain from an empathetic, strength-based perspective—and describes what middle and high school educators can do to make the most of their students’ potential. Thoroughly grounded in current neuroscience research, the book explains what we know about how the adolescent brain works and proposes eight essential instructional elements that will help students develop the ability to think, make healthy choices, regulate their emotions, handle social conflict, consolidate their identities, and learn enough about the world to move into adulthood with dignity and grace. Armstrong provides practical strategies and real-life examples from schools that illustrate these eight key practices in action. In addition, you’ll find a glossary of brain terms, a selection of brain-friendly lesson plans across the content areas, and a list of resources to support and extend the book’s ideas and practices.” (Amazon)

Kaminske, Althea Need. “Time Management: What Is It, Who Has It, and Can You Improve It?” The Learning Scientists, The Learning Scientists, 16 Apr. 2020, 

 

Kaminske’s blog post provides excellent explanations about what time management means and how it supports or challenges students. Though focusing mostly on college learners, the post provides transferable information as well as links to other useful posts related to executive functioning skills. Kaminske references many studies (included in a bibliography), and shares her findings about time management in particular: “What does seem likely based on these studies is that any improvement is not going to happen overnight. Like any skill, it will most likely involve deliberate and consistent practice to improve – and it is a skill worth improving. Better time management is linked to improved academic outcomes and general stress relief.” 

Meltzer, Lynn. Executive Function in Education, Second Edition: From Theory to Practice. Guilford Publications, 2018. 

 

“This groundbreaking volume, now revised and updated, has given thousands of educators and clinicians a deeper understanding of executive function (EF) processes in typically developing children and those with learning difficulties and developmental disabilities. The book elucidates how PreK–12 students develop such key capacities as goal setting, organization, cognitive flexibility, working memory, and self-monitoring. Leading experts in education, neuroscience, and psychology explore the links between EF and academic performance and present practical applications for assessment and instruction. Exemplary practices for supporting students with EF difficulties in particular content areas—reading, writing, and math—are reviewed.” (Guilford Press)

Meltzer, Lynn. Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom. The Guilford Press, 2010. 

 

“Accessible and practical, this book helps teachers incorporate executive function processes—such as planning, organizing, prioritizing, and self-checking—into the classroom curriculum. Chapters provide effective strategies for optimizing what K–12 students learn by improving how they learn. Noted authority Lynn Meltzer and her research associates present a wealth of easy-to-implement assessment tools, teaching techniques and activities, and planning aids. Featuring numerous whole-class ideas and suggestions, the book also shows how to differentiate instruction for students with learning or attention difficulties. Case examples illustrate individualized teaching strategies and classroom accommodations. More than a dozen reproducibles are included; the large-size format facilitates photocopying and day-to-day reference. Purchasers also get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials.” (Amazon)

Meltzer, Lynn. Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom. The Guilford Press, 2010. 

 

“Accessible and practical, this book helps teachers incorporate executive function processes—such as planning, organizing, prioritizing, and self-checking—into the classroom curriculum. Chapters provide effective strategies for optimizing what K–12 students learn by improving how they learn. Noted authority Lynn Meltzer and her research associates present a wealth of easy-to-implement assessment tools, teaching techniques and activities, and planning aids. Featuring numerous whole-class ideas and suggestions, the book also shows how to differentiate instruction for students with learning or attention difficulties. Case examples illustrate individualized teaching strategies and classroom accommodations. More than a dozen reproducibles are included; the large-size format facilitates photocopying and day-to-day reference. Purchasers also get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials.” (Amazon)

Steinberg, Laurence D. Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence. Mariner Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015. 

 

“Over the past few decades, adolescence has lengthened, and this stage of life now lasts longer than ever. Recent research has shown that the adolescent brain is surprisingly malleable, making it a crucial time of life for determining a person’s future success and happiness. In Age of Opportunity, the world-renowned expert on adolescence Laurence Steinberg draws on this trove of fresh evidence to explain the teenage brain’s capacity for change and to offer new strategies for instilling resilience, self-control, and other beneficial traits.” (Mariner)

​​Pink, Daniel. Drive. Riverhead Books, 2009. 

 

“Most people believe that the best way to motivate is with rewards like money—the carrot-and-stick approach. That’s a mistake, says Daniel H. Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others). In this provocative and persuasive new book, he asserts that the secret to high performance and satisfaction-at work, at school, and at home—is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world. Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of life. He examines the three elements of true motivation—autonomy, mastery, and purpose-and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action in a unique book that will change how we think and transform how we live. (Amazon)

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